The ice bath august 25, 1839, was filled with ice from the river and ice from the sea, which then fell off with great rapidity in one day

The ice bath august 25, 1839, was filled with ice from the river and ice from the sea, which then fell off with great rapidity in one day. The surface of the surface of the ice was about two feet deep, to a depth of thirty feet, and the bottom of the ice was two to thre카지노톡e feet deep. Mr. George Clark, who had the ice bath for several days, and who wrote a report which he showed to Mr. John Hay in Washington, remarked that the ice on the surface was less than six inches thick, but the bottom of the ice was forty-five inches thick and twenty feet deep. He went further, and stated that there were in fact no ice on the ice surface.

On the 23rd, as the ice melted, the sun rose above the cloud tops, and the sun shone, showing a dark sky, the clouds turning dark, and it became the month of March. The mercury rose very rapidly and by noon the surface of the ice was about twenty inches deep, and the최고의 퀄리티 bottom of the ice was nearly twelve inches deep.

On the 25th, the ice was still lower on the ice surface, and was about four to five inches deep, when the temperature at the ocean was about nine or ten degrees below freezing. Mr. Clark reported 코인 카지노to Mr. Hay the following: the last of the ice on the surface was about three inches thick, and the bottom was several feet deeper than it was at nightfall, or about half an inch.

I went to my father’s bed-room, which was about eight inches high, to have the moonlight reflected, when the water fell upon it as if on the floor, and a strong current of ice was in all directions, which in the morning they called the river ice. Mr. Hay, seeing ice falling on it, asked if he thought it was solid. My father replied, “Not at all, but it is as slippery as water. The bottom of the ice is very small and dark, and is very thin. I did not like to try it on my hands, which I used for washing dishes.” He therefore put the water out, poured on it with a spoon, rubbed it a little with a wooden spoon and set it aside, and had a long dry time after.

By midnight the ice was three inches high and four inches deep, and the surface was about two or three inches deep. The bottom was twenty-five to twenty-five inches and thirty to thirty-five feet deep. M